Fire, Logging and Elk Migration in the Yaha Tinda 
Map of Mark Hebblewhite's study area that includes the Yaha Tinda Ranch, Banff National Park and the Dogrib fire. Mark has been researching the interaction between elk and wolves.  One project funded by ACA Grants in Biodiversity looks at the impact of fire and salvage logging on elk migration.  Elk prefer the yummy grass that springs up in newly burned areas, so in the last few years, they stayed near the Yaha Tinda Ranch rather than migrate to Banff National Park in the summer.
Map of Mark Hebblewhite's study area that includes the Yaha Tinda Ranch, Banff National Park and the Dogrib fire. Mark has been researching the interaction between elk and wolves. One project funded by ACA Grants in Biodiversity looks at the impact of fire and salvage logging on elk migration. Elk prefer the yummy grass that springs up in newly burned areas, so in the last few years, they stayed near the Yaha Tinda Ranch rather than migrate to Banff National Park in the summer.

This is a photo from our Aerial telemetry plane of
the Dogrib Burn 1-year post burn. The Ya Ha Tinda Ranch is visible in the
far upper right part of the picture. The open areas are the large salvage
logged areas in the Sunpine FMA portion of the burn. You can see the burned
and unsalvaged areas can be reduced effectively by salvage logging.
This is a photo from our Aerial telemetry plane of
the Dogrib Burn 1-year post burn. The Ya Ha Tinda Ranch is visible in the
far upper right part of the picture. The open areas are the large salvage
logged areas in the Sunpine FMA portion of the burn. You can see the burned
and unsalvaged areas can be reduced effectively by salvage logging.

This picture clearly illustrates the differences
between salvaged and unsalvaged areas during winter 2004.
This picture clearly illustrates the differences
between salvaged and unsalvaged areas during winter 2004.

This picture shows an unsalvaged part of the Dogrib burn
outside Sunpines FMA in Dogrib Creek.
This picture shows an unsalvaged part of the Dogrib burn
outside Sunpines FMA in Dogrib Creek.

This picture clearly illustrates a previously cut, then
burned area in the Dogrib burn. You can see the post-harvest mounding in the
cutblock in the foreground that has been burned.
This picture clearly illustrates a previously cut, then
burned area in the Dogrib burn. You can see the post-harvest mounding in the
cutblock in the foreground that has been burned.

this shows a subalpine grassland that has been burned in
upper dogrib creek and the incredible effects fire has on grassland
production - its plain to see why elk like burns! Photo credit R.
Whittington
this shows a subalpine grassland that has been burned in
upper dogrib creek and the incredible effects fire has on grassland
production - its plain to see why elk like burns! Photo credit R.
Whittington

This is a picture of a prescribed fire in Kootenay
National Park during 2001. Photo credit- Parks Canada
This is a picture of a prescribed fire in Kootenay
National Park during 2001. Photo credit- Parks Canada

Researcher Mark Hebblewhite sampling vegetation near
Dogrib Creek in an unburned area.
Researcher Mark Hebblewhite sampling vegetation near
Dogrib Creek in an unburned area.

These are some of my radiocollared elk in the
Dogrib Burn - its not a great picture, but hey, they are wild.
These are some of my radiocollared elk in the
Dogrib Burn - its not a great picture, but hey, they are wild.

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