Dave Latham\'s Wolves 
This is a wolf that inhabits the boreal forest in northeastern Alberta.  Don't you just love those yellow eyes!  Wolves and coyotes travel along linear disturbances such as roads and seismic lines, which gives them more expedient access to prey such as caribou and deer.
This is a wolf that inhabits the boreal forest in northeastern Alberta. Don't you just love those yellow eyes! Wolves and coyotes travel along linear disturbances such as roads and seismic lines, which gives them more expedient access to prey such as caribou and deer.

These two wolves are seen running across a fen, typical peatland habitat.  This is also where woodland caribou can often be seen.
These two wolves are seen running across a fen, typical peatland habitat. This is also where woodland caribou can often be seen.

Biologist Dave Latham prepares to travel by helicopter to check on the many sites in his research area.  It covers 20,000 square kilometers in northeastern Alberta.
Biologist Dave Latham prepares to travel by helicopter to check on the many sites in his research area. It covers 20,000 square kilometers in northeastern Alberta.

Dave has set barbed wire fences with baited with roadkill to attract the wolves and other predators of woodland caribou.  When the wolf jumps over the fence, the barbs catch tufts of its hair.  Dave collects these bits of hair and they are analyzed for DNA.  This gives a much more accurate picture of wolf populations in the area, which is much higher than previously thought.  He's found there are lots of coyotes, too, that are invading the region, probably attracted by the high numbers of deer.
Dave has set barbed wire fences with baited with roadkill to attract the wolves and other predators of woodland caribou. When the wolf jumps over the fence, the barbs catch tufts of its hair. Dave collects these bits of hair and they are analyzed for DNA. This gives a much more accurate picture of wolf populations in the area, which is much higher than previously thought. He's found there are lots of coyotes, too, that are invading the region, probably attracted by the high numbers of deer.

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